fbpx

“Kinloch’s heritage is unique...

Time moves on, but as we build in the present we respect the past."

A History

History tells us that Kinloch’s name comes from the Scottish Gaelic name Ceann Loch meaning ‘head of the loch’.  Originally a sheep station, Kinloch later developed into a holiday destination with kiwi baches being built next to the lake. The settlement owes its inception to the then Prime Minister of New Zealand – Sir Keith Holyoake.

The Past

DISCOVERY OF KINLOCH BY IAN GIBBS AND SIR KEITH HOLYOAKE.

This is the homeland of Ngati Te Kohera, a hapu of Ngati Tuwharetoa. In 1884 2,700 Ha of the Kinloch Valley was purchased from the Maori landowners. The land was progressively milled for its native forest timbers until in 1953 it was purchased by Ian Gibbs and Sir Keith Holyoake for farming purposes. Gibbs and Holyoake also shared a vision of how the township would evolve and become the beautiful village that is Kinloch today.

The Present

LAND DIVIDED AMONG THE HOLYOAKE CHILDREN

Sir Keith had five children who upon his death were offered to have the choice of which block of land they wanted. Diane Comber (nee Holyoake) purchased 34 hectares off her siblings on the plateau on the far Western side.

The Future

TODAY AND MOVING FORWARD

A premier development team is now bringing new life to this piece of paradise. Proximity to the beach, abundant native bush and birds and breathtaking views of the lake and the mountains. This is the Seven Oaks project.

The previous vision of what might become is becoming a reality...and there is a place here for you.